McBride on James Brown

In this book, written ten years after Brown’s death, McBride, a musician himself and a writer, attempted to narrate Brown’s story as Brown would’ve told it. Truth as near truth could be told, erasing what fictional lies written before.

The Godfather of soul music, his statue sits in the middle of downtown Augusta, Georgia,

…”left most of his wealth, conservatively estimated at $100 million to educate poor children in South Carolina and Georgia. Not a dime of it had reached a single kid. Untold millions have been frittered away by politicians and lawyers who have been loosed on one another by various factions of his destroyed family”.

Though claimed to be original, the author dug into the different personalities that may had influenced his style of music. The book talked about categorizing soul music,

… ‘its problem lies in its categorization itself, soul music is generic that means nothing and everything. It’s a label, a sales term.”

Except for his exceptional creativity in music that was passed on to this generation, his is a story of how one successful person ended up a financial disaster, a disaster passed on to his family and community who wanted a bite of his success, or even those who never wanted it, but got burned because they loved the man.

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